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Thread: A Zelenka pupil

  1. #1
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    Default A Zelenka pupil

    Zelenka being a teacher had escaped me until recently except that I knew that Quantz had learned from him around 1719.

    Now (thanks to DJ Dresden - and David Nelson last week), I have found that Christophe Schaffrath (1709-1763) was a Zelenka pupil.

    I have a Schaffrath CD MA 96 04 818 (LC5057) from 1996 with 2 Overtures, 1 Symphony and 2 Concertos - at a guess, one for the boss!? who was Frederick the "so-called" Great and one for himself as Court Harpsichordist. What fine music and why is he yet another unknown?

    Apparently (in 1996 from the sleeve note), at least 62 of his works are in manuscript and, before the Dresden bombing in 1945 there was a lot more. In total 180 works are listed in his inventory. Lund in Sweden is where copies of some of his music is to be found.

    I have fortunately unearthed, previously unnoticed, two of Schaffrath's keyboard sonatas at the back of volume Xl of "Le Tresor des Pianistes" that Da Capo reprinted. The Farrenc family edited these wonderful volumes in the C19th. The second of four movements of the second sonata (dated 1754) is a splendid fugue that resembles the style of JS Bach's "48". CPE Bach and Schaffrath shared Harpsichord duties at the Berlin Court so it is understandable.

    An interesting characteristic of the orchestral and the keyboard works is Schaffrath's love of deep sonorities and I have the fanciful and probably incorrect idea that the deep bass aria in the Prague 1723 Coronation music may have influenced him. Schaffrath presumably would have been taking instruction from Zelenka when he was aged 15 to 20 (1724 to 1730).

    There is no sign of religious music in the Schaffrath list and, as he applied for a Protestant Organ job in Dresden that went to WF Bach, it seems probable that writing Catholic Masses was not part of his agenda.

    I strongly advocate exploration of Christophe Schaffrath.

    Andrew Hinds
    Last edited by Andrew Hinds; 18-02-2017 at 06:34 PM.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: A Zelenka pupil

    Thanks very much for that. I only know Schaffrath's little duo from RIC 314, a fantastic disc of bassoon music which I heartily recommend.

    May I ask about the volume XI of "Le Tresor des Pianiste"? I only found this: http://imslp.org/wiki/Le_tr%C3%A9sor...enc,_Aristide) , downloaded the XI volume but I don't see the Schaffrath piece. Is it there in the reprint?

  3. #3
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    Default Re: A Zelenka pupil

    I bought a hard copy of "Le Tresor des Pianistes" with a fine blue binding about twenty years ago and it dealt with six composers. They were Goldberg 9 pages, Eberlin 33 pages, Mattheson 57 pages, Zipoli 48 pages, Christophe Smith 75 pages and finally Christophe Schaffrath with 17 pages.

    I would need to join something I don't wish to join to access the website with the pdf's so I have not been able to answer your query other than by reference back to my book.

    I hope that this is some help and wonder if my edition is different from the one you have access to. I am enjoying playing Schaffrath on my August Forster black upright piano with its beautiful tone - as good as many grand pianos.

    Andrew Hinds
    Last edited by Andrew Hinds; 19-02-2017 at 01:05 PM.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: A Zelenka pupil

    I can recommend Epoca Barroca's 2 cds "Trios and Sonatas" and "6 Duettos"(CPO) with very nice Schaffrath music. I have to listen to the 2 albums again and try if I can hear Zelenka's influence.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: A Zelenka pupil

    Andrew, thanks! The volume I have has CPE Bach, Nichelmann, D Scarlatti, Froberger, and JS Bach. Maybe your volume got uploaded to the IMSLP with a different number.

    My wife & me have a Schimmel upright piano which certainly has too big a sound for the room it's in. [One neighbour complains sometimes.] Well, in a decade or three, when we're finally rich, maybe we'll move to a place where there'll be no neighbours to bother with XVIIIth century music

  6. #6
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    Default Re: A Zelenka pupil

    There seems to be little relationship between your copies and mine.

    The list of composers in my Da Capo edition was reprinted in the USA in 1977.

    CPE Bach was in Volumes 12 & 13, Nichelmann in vol 10, D Scarlatti in vols 6 & 7, Froberger in vol 3 and JS Bach in vol 8.

    I have Volumes 10, 14 & 15 as well as vol 9 with the two Schaffrath sonatas. They were what particularly interested me of about ten volumes that I could have bought in a secondhand/remainders bookshop in Canterbury many years ago.

    I am due to have a piano lesson on Thursday and have put the fingering in ready for Richard Meyrick (a fine performer and teacher) to hear my take on Schaffrath. He wasn't too impressed with my Joseph Woelfl, a contemporary of Beethoven with whom he had friendly improvisation competitions on the piano and whose three sonatas Opus 6 dedicated to Beethoven can be had from Van Sambeek Edities in Amsterdam. At its best it is very good and his two symphonies are reminiscent of Mozart's last three symphonies but with a larger orchestra. I would recommend a look at Woelfl who was born in Salzburg and died in London in 1812.

    Andrew Hinds
    Last edited by Andrew Hinds; 24-02-2017 at 07:50 PM.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: A Zelenka pupil

    It seems Da Capo rearranged the way pieces were divided into volumes for the reprint; probably it's reasonable that they did it.

    I found some nice fugues by Albrechtsberger and Kirnberger that I had no idea existed in volume X at the IMSLP. [I'm still trying to find a source for the magnificent Albrechtsberger fugue used by Kraus in his Ouverture VB 147.]

    Thanks for the Woelfl recommendation. I'm listening to the Sonarti disc with his Piano Sonata in B Minor (op 38) now, until today I only knew some of his string quartets.

    edit: for the Albrechtsberger / Kraus fugue go here: https://youtu.be/90z1LftfVYE?t=350

    edit 2: I knew I forgot something! To get back to the topic :-), I recommend a very nicely played CD with his Harpsichord Concerto in E : http://en.dux.pl/-oh-schreyfogel-sch...-visconti.html
    Last edited by Elwro; 21-02-2017 at 04:11 PM.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: A Zelenka pupil

    Thanks for the suggestion that I'll try to follow up. (Edit 2: I have just ordered the CD and, following its arrival, thoroughly enjoy playing Schaffrath's CSWV C25. He is an excellent composer! Nine tracks of Johann Friedrich Schreyfogel who died approx 1750 are good too and track 9 reminds me of one of my favourite Pisendel movements. There are unfortunately no notes about the composers on this DUX 1197 disc. The performers are very good.)

    I turned to Marc Honneger's marvellous two volume 1979 Dictionnaire de la Musique (bought in a Brocante in Saillans, Drome, twenty years ago) and find that Schaffrath's 6 sonatas were published in 1754. Two of these were presumably the ones reprinted in the 1872 Volume Xl by L Farrenc. I am confident that my Da Capo volumes are a reprint of the 1872 French edition. I hope that this helps.

    My best keyboard CD of Woelfl is by a Japanese/American pianist Jon Nakamatsu. He is a phenominal player and the 2003 CD is from Harmonia Mundi. One of the sonatas contains an excellent fugue. Apparently, Woelfl in London from 1805 until his death made at least one of his students , Cipriani Potter (1792 to 1871), a Woelfl pupil for five years, learn all 48 Bach Preludes and Fugues by heart! Potter later wrote 9 symphonies and the only movement I have on CD is enjoyable, well-constructed music.

    Returning to the Kraus/Albrechtsberger fugue theme, I have listened to and enjoyed the music on "You Tube" and played all 30 Albrechtsberger fugue themes in Volume XV of "Le Tresor des Pianistes" and am confident that the fugue that you seek is not one of them. Albrechtsberger was a prolific composer and over 350 of his works over 28 different categories were in Esterhaza when FJ Fetis (who wrote the autobiographical note to the fugues) visited there in the C19th. 44 fugues were included in his summary. Sorry to have drawn a blank but you can guess that I have tried!

    Andrew Hinds
    Last edited by Andrew Hinds; 06-03-2017 at 03:37 PM.

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