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l'infastidito
03-12-2014, 07:36 PM
Exclusive pre-Xmas pre-info for all you die-hard Zelenka fans in the forum:
Today is December 3, the main feast day of the Jesuit saint Francis Xavier. In 1719 Princess Maria Josepha brought the Xaverian tradition with her from Vienna, and thereafter it was solemnly celebrated in Dresden as well. So the announcement exactly today of the news Collegium 1704 just revealed to me, that the ensemble will release the "Missa Divi Xaverii" ZWV 12 on CD in 2015, couldn't possibly have been more appropriate or better timed!

Simultaneously Luks & company will make the ZWV 12 score publicly available through a collaboration with the publisher Bärenreiter. The plan is to build a proper Zelenka edition in the next years. A crowdfunding campaign for the CD will be launched very soon that the release depends on - so hopefully everyone reading this announcement is able to contribute (a donation will reward you with a true feeling of personal ownership to the resulting product).
More details will be provided as soon as their crowdfunding campaign is launched.
...What a Xmas gift for all of us!
SVF

Xanaseb
05-12-2014, 12:43 AM
Oh wow!!!
This has made me rather ecstatic!!! Thanks SVF!

Then there'll be the likely accompanying piece(s) of Zelenka music too that they'll probably record (I hope!!)

...maybe Te Deum ZWV146? :eek:
Luks' interpretation they've performed quite a few times now, so they'll be familiar with it. And, it'd be a grand partner for Missa ZWV12.

Happy St. Xavier's everybody! :D

Osbert Parsley
16-12-2014, 09:23 PM
More details will be provided as soon as their crowdfunding campaign is launched

The crowd funding campaign details are here:

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/support-record-of-zelenka-missa-divi-xaverii

djdresden
17-12-2014, 11:22 PM
Fellow Zelenkians – let's all support Maestro Luks so he can record this fantastic work in all its glory.

Johannes

Xanaseb
26-12-2014, 01:42 PM
"The CD will include the world premiere recording of yet another work by Zelenka: Litaniae de Sancto Xaverio ZWV 156"

Great! Another premiere recording, making the release Xaverian in theme. A great opportunity to explore the history of St. Xavier's patronage of the Royal Court of Dresden and Zelenka's possible Jesuit roots in the CD booklet :)

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

Why not celebrate by making this exciting effort a reality :D

l'infastidito
04-01-2015, 03:51 PM
"The CD will include the world premiere recording of yet another work by Zelenka: Litaniae de Sancto Xaverio ZWV 156"

Great! Another premiere recording, making the release Xaverian in theme. A great opportunity to explore the history of St. Xavier's patronage of the Royal Court of Dresden and Zelenka's possible Jesuit roots in the CD booklet :)

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

Why not celebrate by making this exciting effort a reality :D

ZELENKA'S COMPLETE MUSIC FOR S.FRANCIS XAVIER ANNO 1729 (ZWV 12 + ZWV 156). ZWV 156 SOUND SAMPLE BELOW.

Happy New Zelenka Year to everybody! And that's a very good point you've got, dear Xanaseb.
This "Litaniae de Sancto Xaverio" ZWV 156 was in fact the last musical component in Zelenka's total work of art for the Xaverian celebrations in Dresden in 1729. While JDZ signed the kyrie section of "Missa Divi Xaverii" ZWV 12 already on 3 September 1729, the final Agnus Dei section was completed almost 3 months later, on 26 November. ZWV 156 is dated 9 December that year. Thus he must have started composing the litany immediately after the ZWV 12 Agnus Dei for a performance towards the end of the 1729 Xaverian festivities. Therefore the ZWV 12 + 156 on the CD fall into the category of JDZ's musically independent compositions united by the same performance context, very much like ZWV 46 + 47 for Augustus the Strong's funeral rites in 1733, or ZWV 53 + 55 + 56 for the Holy Week in 1722/23.

Despite their occasional unity, the instrumentation of ZWV 156 differs from ZWV 12, but is certainly not less ambitious than the
Mass finished just a few days earlier. The litany is written for natural horns and strings, and the virtuoso horn parts really stand
out. Besides, the vocal parts (choruses & soloists) are demanding, and in ZWV 156, as opposed to the Mass (relatively speaking),
especially the bass singer can show off. Just listen to the impressive horn + voices interaction in the "Tuba resonans" movement.
Sound sample here: http://wikisend.com/download/190296/Zwv 156-Tuba resonans.wma
As the functioning Kapellmeister Zelenka apparently had to consider that everyone among Dresden's star musicians should be kept employed and given their special opportunity to shine - but they clearly had to work and sweat for their money!

In other words: ZWV 156 is yet another reason to be excited about and to support Collegium 1704's Xaverian recording. Remember that for example a 100€ donation includes a copy of the CD, sent to you before the public release date. Details: www.igg.me/at/collegium1704 (http://www.igg.me/at/collegium1704)


P.S.: Unfortunately I don't have any info on the ensemble or the performance of my ZWV 156 sample here. Maybe someone else in the forum can help us?

SVF

djdresden
05-01-2015, 01:14 AM
The sample is taken from a superb concert held in the Annenkirche in Dresden on 3 December 2002, on the 450th anniversary of the death of Franz Xaver. The musicians were Dresden Barockorchester and Dresdner Kammerchor, directed by Rademann, of course. Heinichen and Schürer's Litaniae Xaverianae were also performed, both truly outstanding works. The Xaveriana tradition was really something else in Dresden.

ZWV 156 is another masterpiece from Zelenka. It is such a brilliant and positive work, which leaves one with a great sense of well-being. It radiates brightness. Our composer didn't do much wrong during these years. Neither did Heinichen, all the way until his untimely and desperately sad death in 1729. Proh dolor! Theirs was a formiddable team and we have now uncovered evidence of how much Heinichen esteemed Zelenka. As for Schürer, Zelenka's student: well, one year after the death of his master he was the hottest young composer in Dresden. The correspondence of the nobility in 1746-47 confirms this in no uncertain way, the praise for his compositions is astonishing. While Schürer is unrecorded we still do not have the full picture of Zelenka's legacy.

Msl
26-01-2015, 10:05 PM
ZELENKA'S COMPLETE MUSIC FOR S.FRANCIS XAVIER ANNO 1729 (ZWV 12 + ZWV 156). ZWV 156 SOUND SAMPLE BELOW.

Happy New Zelenka Year to everybody! And that's a very good point you've got, dear Xanaseb.
This "Litaniae de Sancto Xaverio" ZWV 156 was in fact the last musical component in Zelenka's total work of art for the Xaverian celebrations in Dresden in 1729. While JDZ signed the kyrie section of "Missa Divi Xaverii" ZWV 12 already on 3 September 1729, the final Agnus Dei section was completed almost 3 months later, on 26 November. ZWV 156 is dated 9 December that year. Thus he must have started composing the litany immediately after the ZWV 12 Agnus Dei for a performance towards the end of the 1729 Xaverian festivities. Therefore the ZWV 12 + 156 on the CD fall into the category of JDZ's musically independent compositions united by the same performance context, very much like ZWV 46 + 47 for Augustus the Strong's funeral rites in 1733, or ZWV 53 + 55 + 56 for the Holy Week in 1722/23.

Despite their occasional unity, the instrumentation of ZWV 156 differs from ZWV 12, but is certainly not less ambitious than the
Mass finished just a few days earlier. The litany is written for natural horns and strings, and the virtuoso horn parts really stand
out. Besides, the vocal parts (choruses & soloists) are demanding, and in ZWV 156, as opposed to the Mass (relatively speaking),
especially the bass singer can show off. Just listen to the impressive horn + voices interaction in the "Tuba resonans" movement.
Sound sample here: http://wikisend.com/download/190296/Zwv 156-Tuba resonans.wma
As the functioning Kapellmeister Zelenka apparently had to consider that everyone among Dresden's star musicians should be kept employed and given their special opportunity to shine - but they clearly had to work and sweat for their money!

In other words: ZWV 156 is yet another reason to be excited about and to support Collegium 1704's Xaverian recording. Remember that for example a 100€ donation includes a copy of the CD, sent to you before the public release date. Details: www.igg.me/at/collegium1704 (http://www.igg.me/at/collegium1704)


P.S.: Unfortunately I don't have any info on the ensemble or the performance of my ZWV 156 sample here. Maybe someone else in the forum can help us?

SVF

There is nog much time left to make this cowdfunding project successful

l'infastidito
27-01-2015, 03:15 PM
ANOTHER INTERESTING ZWV 156 SAMPLE

There is nog much time left to make this cowdfunding project successful

Yes, now we have about 3 days left from the crowdfunding part of Collegium 1704's pioneering CD project, so let's hope for a couple of generous last-minute donors!
I believe every single Euro counts, giving Collegium 1704 more freedom to make the best possible artistical and musicological
choices during the process.
However, don't forget that the IBAN bank account numbers found on their homepage always remain open as an alternative funding possibility: http://www.collegium1704.com/cs/kontakt.html


Finally I offer you another small sample from the included ZWV 156 litany (for the rest you'll have to wait ;-) ). Maybe this
makes you just as curious as it made me? Isn't the "auxiliator naufragantium"/ "fugator daemonum" part here strikingly similar to
the seastorm-motif in the ZWV 47 "Invitatorum" composed for the 1733 funeral 3 years and 3 months later? I've put the mentioned ZWV 47 excerpt directly in front of the relevant ZWV 156 part in my last sample for comparison:
http://wikisend.com/download/964258/Zwv 47 + 156_samples.wma

SVF

rnkt
06-11-2015, 03:07 PM
ready for Christmas? Hope so!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5vBcAcUlHH8

Msl
06-11-2015, 11:24 PM
Thanks

kaufen
09-11-2015, 03:15 PM
Finally! Recording of Zelenka's Missa Divi Xaverii has begun! Remembering the concerts with this piece from the last year, we can't wait for the result. Have a look on the video from the recording in the church of St Anne – Prague Crossroads.

Alistair
27-11-2015, 02:34 PM
Vaclav Luks has told me that this CD will be ready at the end of this year, but will officially appear in February/March 2016.

Scott
02-02-2016, 06:20 PM
CD advertised for sale:https://www.jpc.de/jpcng/classic/detail/-/art/jan-dismas-zelenka-missa-divi-xaverii-zwv-12/hnum/1042825

Available 15-2-16:)

Xanaseb
10-02-2016, 09:05 PM
CD advertised for sale:https://www.jpc.de/jpcng/classic/detail/-/art/jan-dismas-zelenka-missa-divi-xaverii-zwv-12/hnum/1042825

Available 15-2-16:)

Cool album cover. It's a Nautilus shell on beach sand - nice subtle link to the Indo-Pacific travelling St. Xavier, as well as of course the beautiful golden-ratio spiral reflecting Zelenka's music.

Can't wait for mine go arrive :D

Xanaseb
25-02-2016, 04:03 PM
operaplus.cz/jak-probiha-rekonstrukce-zapomenuteho-dila/?pa=1 (http://operaplus.cz/jak-probiha-rekonstrukce-zapomenuteho-dila/?pa=1)

^An article just out (in Czech) written by Václav Luks about his interpretation efforts with the score of ZWV 12. It's almost the same as the section written in the CD book notes. They were excellent, as per usual, as was the music recording from start to finish. Positively glowing with radiant energy and clarity. Luks says that the Benedictus aria was the most difficult because Zelenka's notation isn't entirely clear whether it is a viola or oboe (it starts out in the Alto C-Clef). It's also in B-minor and has lots of sharps, so they chose the Oboe D'Amore, more often heard elsewhere (ie.) in Bach and Graupner) and less so in Dresden. I really love the colour it brings to the Mass however, so I fully appreciate their decision.

Jan Stockigt did the historiographical notes. I like her speculation that Zelenka was partly motivated to compose such lavish music with the intention of spiritually aiding Maria Josepha's fortunes - The previous heir, Joseph August, had died in 1728, and the only surviving male child, Friedrich Christian (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_Christian,_Elector_of_Saxony) was crippled by poor health and lame legs. So, around 9 months later was born a new baby boy prince, which she named Franz Xavier(first name) Albert August Ludwig Benno (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince_Francis_Xavier_of_Saxony), in tribute to her Jesuit patron saint, and Saint Benno of Meissen where the family had gone in the past year on pilgrimage. And as a celebration Mass, Zelenka composed Missa Gratias Agimus Tibi (titled 'Promissae Gloriae' in Prague). Stockigt hints that on top of his position as acting Kapellmeister post-Heinichen, perhaps Zelenka felt involved in this fortuitous turn of the Royal family's.

A truly great few months for Zelenka releases! :)

--------------

rnkt
25-02-2016, 11:07 PM
Yeah, my CD arrived a few days ago and I have been revelling in it on some long train journeys the last days! Altogether a fine disc, not to mention the cover design and sleevenotes, the latter being particularly illuminating as mentioned by Xanaseb



So, around 9 months later was born a new baby boy prince, which she named Franz Xavier(first name) Albert August Ludwig Benno, in tribute to her Jesuit patron saint, and Saint Benno of Meissen where the family had gone in the past year on pilgrimage.

i have to admit I made a double-take here. Was Dr Stockigt implying some kind of divine influence of Zelenka's Xaverian works on the royal pair or maybe hinting at an aphrodisiac effect of his music? Apart from Sancti Josephi it is probably his second or third most romping mass setting (esp. the Gloria), so I am sure it got some pulses racing. Forget Mozart for babies, how about Zelenka for conception?!

While the details in the booklet were really interesting, I felt they did miss a few things regarding the actual music. For instance, the origin of that great and really quite catchy motif which is worked in various ways into the Kyrie I, Christe and Kyrie II, not to mention the Dona Nobis Pacem. To have such a lyrical theme in the Kyrie is a little bit unusual for mid-career, full orchestra Zelenka - he normally went for a noisy, grand opening. I think he did it differently in ZWV 12 to a request, possibly from Josepha herself. It is possible that she was particularly fond of Zelenka's theme in the Quonium of Missa Circumcisionis Domini Nostri Jesu Christi (ZWV 11) which Zelenka composed a year earlier. The extension of that theme to the ZWV 12 theme in its various manifestations is pretty obvious I think.

A further, less obvious and maybe rather more speculative aspect is the inspiration for the Benedictus Hosanna fugue. In 1729, shortly before his death, Heinichen composed a rather nice setting of the Magnificat (A major Seibel 90). Towards the beginning the chorus launches into an energetic fugue on the words "et exsultavit" to a theme which bears more than a passing resemblance to Zelenka's ZWV 12 Hosanna motif from later in the year. It is unclear if Heinichen ever heard his Magnificat performed and given his failing health it might have fallen to Zelenka to perform it, or not as may also have been the case (perhaps the Dresden scholars can comment!).

In any case, I speculate that Zelenka let himself be inspired by this motif of his former superior. Perhaps it was even a subtle nod towards the man who I like to think was also a close friend and collaborator of Zelenka. Very little seems to have been written about the Zelenka-Heinichen relationship, probably because there are no sources which shed much light on it. However, one simply has to compare the music of both men and one can see that these two were very much on the same wavelength. I dipped into a lot of the recorded Heinichen (sadly not enough) in recent months and was quite startled to find that several characteristics I considered as "Zelenkanisms" repeatedly crop up in Heinichen's music too. I mean, major/minor switches, sudden harmonic shifts (some even more bold and dramatic than the most scary Zelenka ones actually!) and also handling of the orchestra, not just as a bland accompaniment to the vocalists/choir but also bringing colour and energy. Of course there are differences and things which remain more unique to Zelenka - the use of syncopation, the dotted rhythms, the dark tones. But anyway, after this foray into Heinichen I ask myself the question - who actually influenced who? Or did they develop this style together? Certainly I think the evidently very devout catholic Zelenka might have been a useful religious guide for the lutheran Heinichen, advising him on appropriate settings of the catholic liturgy. On the other hand, Heinichen, I personally believe was up there with Handel and the other greats regarding showstopping vocal lines and this might have helped Zelenka learn the ropes in the opera department.

Well, perhaps the Zelenka researchers can shoot down or otherwise comment on this Heinichen relationship thing. Or maybe it was already discussed in this forum but I did not find it. In which case, sorry.

The second work on the new disc, the Xaverian litanies is also a premiere recording and a fine work. The setting for orchestra and a pair of horns is again very reminiscent of Heinichen and again I am wondering, given the Kappelmeister's death earlier in the year, and the fact that there does not seem to have been a setting of the litanies performed in 1728 (scholars, please correct me if I am wrong) whether Zelenka actually partially based his setting on sketches from Heinichen. Especially the opening section and quite brilliant alto aria "Cujus potestati" (totally nailed on the disk by Lucile Richardot) seem a little atypical of Zelenka of this period.

Well, lots of speculation inspired by this fine disc - a perfect yin to complement the definitive yang of the recent Vespertini I disc from Inégal!

- RNKT

Xanaseb
26-02-2016, 08:02 PM
i have to admit I made a double-take here. Was Dr Stockigt implying some kind of divine influence of Zelenka's Xaverian works on the royal pair or maybe hinting at an aphrodisiac effect of his music? Apart from Sancti Josephi it is probably his second or third most romping mass setting (esp. the Gloria), so I am sure it got some pulses racing. Forget Mozart for babies, how about Zelenka for conception?!


:D Haha, yes!

Great thoughts on Heinichen-Zelenka. I've yet to give a proper listen to his stuff, but I have given a good read of a thesis on his Vespers music by Dr Margaret Williams, which I recommend if you want to delve into his musical history. Amazingly, the whole thing has been uploaded for free access via the University of Bristol website (http://research-information.bristol.ac.uk/en/theses/the-vespers-music-of-jd-heinichen-16831729(7cac4ed5-b85c-4ad5-9e91-57c346fcfe46).html), with all her editions of his Magnificats (8!), Psalm settings, Hymns and Marian antiphons.
I totally agree that they rubbed off on each other, and they did miss an opportunity to mention that on the sleevenotes. Zelenka's music reaches a stage in 1729-33 where his musical language sits/flows very comfortably and naturally (to my ear anyway!) - qualities admired and advocated by Heinichen in his writings (he calls it "good taste" in Der General-Bass in der Composition). I think this is no coincidence. It's as if Zelenka absorbed style from his former colleague. Now what about hearing Zelenka in Heinichen's music? It's something that calls out to be looked into. Liturgical & theological advice, indeed! Something that struck me from Dr Williams' thesis is that Heinichen's hymn-settings were all written contrapuntally and with a more antiquated feeling to them. She does say however that they all have a Baroque focus (so, concentrated on harmonic progression/direction) and don't have the cross-rhythms which we see in the Rennaisance/Early Baroque era (and in Zelenka's own music!). But what about Heinichen's spirited fugues?..

Now:

Well, perhaps the Zelenka researchers can shoot down or otherwise comment on this Heinichen relationship thing. Or maybe it was already discussed in this forum but I did not find it. In which case, sorry.

I think djdresden will have something to contribute here. A number of times he's referred to a document discovered from 1728 which shows the reverence felt towards Zelenka by Heinichen! I guess that it'll be covered in the upcoming publications.

As for the motif-inspirations, I think you're on to something. I even hear it in the lilting Sancte Francisce (I&II) horn-arias in ZWV 156, and the little two-horn flourish in Gloria Societatis Jesu (something you hear almost exactly in ZWV 177 "Cosi per la foresta" Amore's first aria). Or maybe all the wonderful Dresden horn music from the time sounds similar... Either way, I think there was a lot of musical influence from Heinichen on Zelenka.

:cool:


-------

djdresden
29-02-2016, 10:16 AM
Amen to all above. And I’d like to think that Zelenka also had an influence on Heinichen. While the latter had much to give to the former when it came to sharing his experiences from his Italian soujourn and studies with some of the Italian masters, Zelenka would have shared with Heinichen his experiences of learning under Fux, and the finer details of the sacred music traditions of the Habsburgs. Heinichen must have thought well of Zelenka, with the former suggesting that the latter should receive a payment rise of 50% in 1728, see my article on the secular vocal collection of Zelenka, and my forthcoming aricle in the Prague conference proceedings, where this document will be published in full for the first time.