Posts by Xanaseb

    Perfect!

    A remarkable report, Jóhannes, and so promising.


    It is clear that the past few decades have been a voyage of revelation and discovery in bringing Zelenka's life and spirit more fully to light. I often wonder, donning my spiritual cap, if the man himself is guiding it...


    We await to hear it (and see it) ourselves sometime in hopefully not too distant future.


    Deo Gratias!

    Agreed! Great find. This was lovely to listen to, and their other recordings look interesting, too. They seem to be focussing on the Neapolitan late baroque. Someone should, indeed...

    Hello,


    Yes, very much agreed! Thanks for sharing. Orliński packs a punch. Zelenka's more galante style is conveyed with great energy and lightness by Il Pomo D'oro (The Tomato! :cool:)


    Seb

    [FONT=&amp]https://collegium1704.com/en/universo-1704/miserere/


    Please check out this newest performance by the Czech ensemble, of the *other* Miserere, ZWV56 in D minor from 1722 (not the famous ZWV57 in C minor from 1738). They did a fantastic job.



    This piece was written for Lenten Holy Week sacred music, finishing Matins in the afternoon (as it was customarily held in Dresden).
    From Dr. Janice Stockigt's book:



    '...Zelenka set Ps. 50(51), Miserere (ZWV56), an extended work comprising several polyphonic movements, including retrograde canons for the setting of verse 15, 'Docebo. . . convertentur (titled 'Versetto circolare'). This movement was later retexted and published at the conclusion of the fourth lesson of Telemann's fortnightly journal Der getreue Musicmeister (...began in 1728) as 'Canon mit 14 Verkehrungen' (ZWV179 [Cantate Domino]).' - pg. 113.



    The polyphony is interesting indeed, but there's plenty of other good stuff in it too. The opening is probably my favourite. Note that the second, ostinato, movement is the same composition as the Christe Eleison from ZWV26, recorded last year by Collegium 1704 in 'Missa 1724'.



    Dr. Stockigt also cites how the piece was received (or almost received) by the Catholic Royal Court in Dresden in 1722, quoting from the Jesuit Diarium:



    "[Wednesday in Holy Week, 1 April] At about 3.30pm. Matins, Lamentations and Responses, Benedictus and finally, the Miserere, composed by Zelenka. The Prince and Princess were present throughout Matins. However, as the composed works were too long, the Prince had someone persuade Zelenka to shorten the singing. As a result the Miserere was omitted , and on subsequent days it was read in the usual manner." - pg. 87.



    Poor Mr. Zelenka! He should have seen it coming, though :D



    Then in 1737 this note is made by the Jesuits:
    "8 Apr. At four o'clock, a very long Miserere was produced by Zelenka." - pg. 219.
    Presumably, therefore, he got it out there in the end, unless they're referring to the other famous one, perhaps performed the year previous to the dating.



    Enjoy listening, thanks to Collegium 1704.

    [/FONT]

    You beat me to it, Msl!
    This was a fantastic performance, and so interesting to hear it sung just by 8 soloists. It creates a very different dynamic.

    Hello all,


    We've come to an amazing point now where the majority of Zelenka's works have been performed and recorded, including almost all of his truly 'great' compositions. How grateful we should be for this bountiful flourish of music over the past 10-15 years or so.


    But there are some more lurking around.


    Here's my bucket list. I wonder if you'd concur and if you have any which I may have missed which you much desire to be recorded, either for the first time or again in a better/improved way?


    [Pasted from this thread on new ZWV 3 video]
    1. I haven't personally heard any recordings of Zelenka's 'other' Miserere, ZWV 56, though I know it's come up in some performances over the years (please let me know if you have a recording of this!).
    2. Missa Eucharistica ZWV 15 would be well worth listening to, even though it's a bit truncated.
    3. I'd much love to hear like his 'a capella' Litaniae Lauretanae ZWV 150 for the pilgrimage to the Marian shrine at Graupen (Krupka) in 1725. This is a simple work which any ensemble should be able to pull off with ease (I would love my own choirmaster to give it a go)
    4. The other half of the Sub Tuum Praesidium ZWV 157 would be great to hear.
    5. Then there's the series of late 1720s Masses, glorious belters that could do with fresher recordings, especially Missa Circumcisionis ZWV 11 & Missa Gratias Agimus Tibi ZWV 13.


    All the best,


    Seb :cool:

    This literally brought tears to my eyes. For years I so much wanted this to be performed...


    I think that now we have no known 'top tier' Zelenka work without a first-class recording!


    I think we can name a few:
    I haven't personally heard any recordings of Zelenka's 'other' Miserere, ZWV 56, though I know it's come up in some performances over the years.
    Also, Missa Eucharistica ZWV 15 would be well worth listening to, even though it's a bit truncated.
    Then there are a few special ones I'd much love to hear like his 'a capella' Litaniae Lauretanae ZWV 150 for the pilgrimage to the Marian shrine at Graupen (Krupka) in 1725. This is a simple work which any ensemble should be able to pull off with ease (I would love my own choirmaster to give it a go)
    Also the other half of the Sub Tuum Praesidium ZWV 157 would be great to hear.
    Then there's the series of late 1720s Masses, glorious belters that could do with fresher recordings, especially Missa Circumcisionis ZWV 11 & Missa Gratias Agimus Tibi ZWV 13.


    Edit: See this thread where I ask what would be on your Zelenka recording request list

    Wow that was great, many gems throughout.


    The opening Kyrie takes multiple listens to appreciate its interwoven and variating texture and is very positive & uplifting.
    The Credo highlight was the 4 basses sing the Crucifixus, but other great stuff in there too.
    The Benedictus Bass solo is magnificent.
    I was personally most ecstatic to hear the Gregorian-chant-inspired Agnus Dei which I've been wishing to see an ensemble tackle. They all must have had a LOT of stamina to pull that one off.

    Hello everyone,


    A little while back now Dr. Jiří Kroupa collated various papers from the Prague Zelenka Conferences 2017-2019: http://www.acecs.cz/cu_2019_08.php


    Here is the list of articles:

    ---
    DRISCOLL, Michael: Zelenka's arrangements of Dixit Dominus settings by other composers



    KAPSA, Václav: The place of Jan Dismas Zelenka within Prague's sacred music scene as viewed through the inventory of the Knights of the Cross with the Red Star



    KIERNAN, Frederic: Wolfgang Horn and Zelenka



    ÓSKARSSON, Kjartan: Zelenka and chalumeau



    SANYAL, Sebastian: The Zelenka family in Louňovice: Some findings from local history and parish registers



    STOCKIGT, Janice B.: The genesis and evolution of Missa Sanctae Caeciliae (ZWV 1), Jan Dismas Zelenka



    VOKŘÍNEK, Lukáš: Kmotrovství v rodině kantora a varhaníka Jiříka Zelenky Bavorovského [Godparenthood in the family of the schoolmaster and organist Jiřík Zelenka Bavorovský]
    ---


    These are well worth reading, enjoy!


    There is also an article by Jóhannes Ágústsson in Clavibus Unitis 2020, on the diaries of Crown Prince Friedrich Christian.


    Best wishes,


    Seb

    That was a sublime, top-class performance. Each showed a different facet to the jewel of 18thC sacred music. These three composers were absolute masters of that field, the music clearly shows.


    Again Zelenka surprises with this Credo! The sudden breakdown at 'at homo factus est', an extended and interesting 'crucifixus' and a jaw-dropping highly chromatic 'amen' fugue to finish, in keeping with those of his Vespers, indeed.


    Also, judging by these performances Caldara needs more attention by the musical world, thats for sure.


    Thanks djdresden!


    Seb